Tag Archives: family

An Advent Invitation

26 Nov

advent wreathWe all have plenty of time.

If that seems like a crazy statement, think about what you’d do if you found out there was a huge wildfire coming toward you. Suddenly, your schedule would open up, and you’d be able to do what you needed to do to secure your home and family.

In today’s Gospel, Jesus challenges us to be prepared before disaster strikes. One of the best things we can do on an ongoing basis to keep our family secure is to fortify our marriages. Often, since our marriages seem to be “okay,” we turn our time and attention elsewhere. But our marriages are our vocation, our life’s work! Don’t we owe it to our spouses to invest time in making them great?!

This Advent, why not adopt one small practice that will bring more joy to your marriage? See www.joyfulmarriageproject.com for ideas.

The foregoing is this week’s installment of the “Marriage Minute,” produced by the Marriage and Family Life Office of the Archdiocese, which attempts to view the Sunday readings through the lens of the Sacrament of Marriage.

Winning the Battle of Family Life

11 Oct

Image result for Moses in battleAre you or someone you know facing a serious struggle? It could be at home or at work. It could be your spouse, one of your children, or a friend.

We learn three important lessons from Moses in this week’s reading from Exodus:

(1) Moses is not afraid to confront the battle.

(2) Moses relies primarily on prayer to win the battle.

(3) Moses is not afraid to accept help to win the battle.

In the daily struggles of marriage and family life, it is important to take the same approach. Recognize and confront your battles, rely on prayer, and ask for help if needed.

  • What is the biggest battle your spouse faces?
  • What is the biggest battle you face today?
  • What is the biggest battle your children face today?
  • What time have you set aside to bring these situations to prayer?
  • Who can you ask for help to support you in your family’s battles?
  • Is there a struggling family to whom you can reach out and help?

The foregoing is this week’s installment of the “Marriage Minute,” produced by the Marriage and Family Life Office of the Archdiocese, which attempts to view the Sunday readings through the lens of the Sacrament of Marriage.

What Is the Opposite of Love?

26 Aug

marriage1If you said “hate,” you’re probably in agreement with most people, but St. John Paul II had a different opinion. He wrote that love’s opposite is “use.”

In Sunday’s Gospel, Jesus asks His disciples to examine their intentions as they invite guests to a party. Did they invite someone only to get an invite in return?

It may seem strange, but even in marriage, we need to guard against using each other. We can check the purity of our intentions by asking ourselves:

  • Am I performing a kind act in order to get a specific response from my spouse?
  • Is this action coming from a joyful heart, or out of a desire to not “be in the doghouse”?
  • Do I keep track of good deeds, words, or even intimacy?

If you find you answered “yes,” ask Jesus to purify your intentions.

The foregoing is this week’s installment of the “Marriage Minute,” produced by the Marriage and Family Life Office of the Archdiocese, which attempts to view the Sunday readings through the lens of the Sacrament of Marriage.

Discipline = Love

19 Aug

Do your children ever give you grief because you love them enough to discipline them? Even though they may not agree or understand, we know we owe them the gift of discipline.  And yet, we all know that it is sometimes easier to let behaviors slide because we know that our disciplinary efforts will take time and effort.

Our experience of parental discipline helps us to understand how God our Father treats all of His children. We hear in this Sunday’s second reading, “For whom the Lord loves He disciplines.” God’s love for His children is constant and never tiring.  If we want to parent like God, we must be constant in our loving discipline for the sake of our children’s growth.

This week, let us pray for the grace to be constant in discipline and, when we do discipline our children, may we act out of kindness and reassure them that they are loved.

The foregoing is this week’s installment of the “Marriage Minute,” produced by the Marriage and Family Life Office of the Archdiocese, which attempts to view the Sunday readings through the lens of the Sacrament of Marriage.

Stand Firm

12 Aug

Image result for sacred heart of jesusHave you ever been the butt of family jokes because you attend Mass faithfully, make counter-cultural parenting decisions, or have “too many” kids?

If your faith has ever made you unpopular, you’re experiencing what Jesus describes in the Gospel this week. Sometimes our faith becomes a dividing line between us and family, and this can make us feel torn or even guilty for causing the disruption.

We need to remember that Jesus is calling us to authentic unity with our loved ones, and unity ultimately comes from Him. It may seem as if our getting serious about the faith has caused the problem, but really we are just the first to take a step toward authentic unity.

Like Christ Himself, we can help to bring our loved ones along through our silent, loving witness and by offering the pain of being misunderstood for their conversion.

The foregoing is this week’s installment of the “Marriage Minute,” produced by the Marriage and Family Life Office of the Archdiocese, which attempts to view the Sunday readings through the lens of the Sacrament of Marriage.

Parents, Listen to Your Own Wisdom

29 Jul

Has your child ever demanded, “Mom, tell my brother to share the Legos with me!”? If so, you can relate to Jesus’ experience in this week’s Gospel when He is asked to instruct siblings to share the family inheritance with one another.

As parents dealing with children or looking at this Gospel, it is easy to recognize the jealousy at the root of these situations, and we have the wisdom to say, “Possessions are not the source of happiness.” However, we parents face the same temptation of jealousy.

A new car, new house, new clothing, new phone, or a new kitchen seems to call our name every day.  None of these things are bad, but we can want them for the wrong reasons.  Let us take the time this week to check the motivations of our heart and to be grateful for what we do have. We can set the example for our children of what it means to be poor in spirit.

Can You Prove Your Christianity?

21 Apr

aaaaHave you ever noticed that it’s often easier to be kind to strangers when you’re angry than it is to be kind to your family?

In this Sunday’s responsorial psalm we hear that the Lord is “slow to anger and abounding in compassion,” and in the Gospel Jesus tells His disciples that they will be known by how well they love. How well we love our families, especially in anger, is proof of our Christianity!

If that’s a challenge, consider this. We don’t have to feel warm and fuzzy to be kind. In fact, often when we act kind or compassionate despite our feelings to the contrary, the feelings follow.

The next time we may feel tempted to snap at our loved ones, let’s try to think of what it would look like to respond with “abounding compassion.” This self-control will be a powerful witness to our children.

The foregoing is this week’s installment of the “Marriage Minute,” produced by the Marriage and Family Life Office of the Archdiocese, which attempts to view the Sunday readings through the lens of the Sacrament of Marriage.