Tag Archives: marriage minute

“I can see!”

23 Mar

This weekend’s readings are about seeing clearly. While few people experience physical healing like the blind man in the Gospel, many of us can recall times when God has allowed us to see a situation from a new perspective—with equally miraculous results.

If you and your spouse keep running up against the same conflict or difficulty, perhaps you are in need of a new perspective.

  • Pray specifically for God to “open your eyes” to a new way of seeing your spouse and his or her perspective.
  • Seek counsel from a couple whose marriage you respect who may have traveled through similar difficult circumstances in the past.
  • Gain new insights and skills from a marriage enrichment program such as Living in Love or Worldwide Marriage Encounter.

Other practical marriage tips can be found at www.JoyfulMarriageProject.com.

The foregoing is this week’s installment of the “Marriage Minute,” produced by the Marriage and Family Life Office of the Archdiocese, which attempts to view the Sunday readings through the lens of the Sacrament of Marriage.

Are you willing to die?

16 Mar

This week, St. Paul reminds us that “While we were still sinners, Christ died for us” (Rom. 5:8). As married people, we are called to imitate Jesus by laying down our lives for our spouses, a theme that runs through many of our most cherished love stories.

We see great nobility in one spouse taking a bullet for the other, even though it usually doesn’t come to that!

If we are literally willing to die for each other, we must also be willing to die to ourselves in little ways–while our spouse is still a sinner.  Here are some ideas:

  • Pick up those socks without comment.
  • Answer a bad attitude with lavish affirmation.
  • Do one of your spouse’s chores without getting noticed.
  • Seek understanding instead of the “last word.”
  • Listen to your spouse without trying to “fix the problem.”

Build a more joyful marriage at www.JoyfulMarriageProject.com.

The foregoing is this week’s installment of the “Marriage Minute,” produced by the Marriage and Family Life Office of the Archdiocese, which attempts to view the Sunday readings through the lens of the Sacrament of Marriage.

The Original Fall of Marriage

2 Mar

untitledIn this week’s readings, we hear about the fall of our original parents, Adam and Eve. We sometimes forget that this initial temptation and subsequent sin was not only an attack on the first two humans, it was attack on marriage and God’s beautiful plan of communion between the first husband and wife.

Adam and Eve were called to cultivate the Garden of Eden and protect it, with divine assistance. We can approach our marriages in the same way. Our Sacraments are gifts from God, and we have the calling to cultivate and protect them with divine assistance. How do we do this?

  • Unlike Adam and Eve, ask God for help when trouble arises.
  • Give each other the benefit of the doubt when a misunderstanding arises.
  • Be the first to ask for forgiveness.
  • Be quick to offer forgiveness.

For other practical ways this Lent to cultivate and protect your marriage including ways to pray together, go to www.JoyfulMarriageProject.com.

The foregoing is this week’s installment of the “Marriage Minute,” produced by the Marriage and Family Life Office of the Archdiocese, which attempts to view the Sunday readings through the lens of the Sacrament of Marriage.

The Lord of the Wedding Rings

25 Feb

f718c73f-12be-4393-9d5f-2ace13bb0e2cIn Tolkien’s novel The Return of the King, the Steward of Gondor has been at his post so long he has forgotten that he is merely the guardian of the land, not its king. He sees it as his possession. This leads to a grasping at the last clutches of power, a resentment toward the real king, and ultimately an untimely death born of despair.

This Sunday’s second reading reminds us that we are “stewards of the mysteries of God. As married people, we are called specifically to safeguard the Sacrament of Matrimony. This means our marriages are a gift from God for which we are meant to care, not possess or dominate.  This perspective is freeing!  It helps us:

  • Worry less, because God is with us.
  • Release our spouse (and ourselves!) from unrealistic expectations.
  • Love our children in the most generous way.
  • See our vocation as the noble calling it is!

For more resources, go to www.JoyfulMarriageProject.com.

The foregoing is this week’s installment of the “Marriage Minute,” produced by the Marriage and Family Life Office of the Archdiocese, which attempts to view the Sunday readings through the lens of the Sacrament of Marriage.

Be Holy!

16 Feb

dishes

In this week’s readings, we are exhorted to “be holy.” We might be inclined to think that this is a lofty call only for those off in monasteries. Well, it’s not! We are all called to holiness, and for married people, the vocation of marriage is our pathway to get there.

St. Katherine Drexel said that holiness consists in “doing God’s will as he wills it, because he wills it.” For us, that is so simple that we often miss it. It is found in everyday things like:

  • Doing that sink full of dishes or that load of laundry
  • Being home from work on time, so you can eat with the family
  • Helping with bedtime
  • Taking an extra 30 seconds to text your spouse something you appreciate about them
  • Saying a short prayer together before you both head out the door in the morning
  • Taking time to prioritize your marriage through a retreat or enrichment program.

For more ideas on seeking holiness through marriage see: www.JoyfulMarriageProject.com.

The foregoing is this week’s installment of the “Marriage Minute,” produced by the Marriage and Family Life Office of the Archdiocese, which attempts to view the Sunday readings through the lens of the Sacrament of Marriage.

The Super Bowl of Life

2 Feb

super-bowlIt’s kickoff time! When you hear that, you’re probably thinking of the Super Bowl, which is one of the most “sacred” events of our secular culture. However, in addition to crowning a football champion this weekend, it’s also time to kick off National Marriage Week.

While National Marriage Week doesn’t have the pomp and circumstance that the football game has, perhaps it should. While Super Bowl Sunday is a great opportunity to come together with friends and watch incredible athletes achieve the heights of athletic performance, it also challenges us to strive for excellence in our own marriage.

What if we approached our marriage in the same way that these incredible athletes approached this game? What if we prioritized and sacrificed to achieve the heights of marital joy with the same intentionality these athletes have sacrificed to be crowned as champions?  For your joyful marriage training protocol, go to www.JoyfulMarriageProject.com.

The foregoing is this week’s installment of the “Marriage Minute,” produced by the Marriage and Family Life Office of the Archdiocese, which attempts to view the Sunday readings through the lens of the Sacrament of Marriage.

A Joyful Calling

26 Jan

marriage1In two weeks, you’ll be invited to participate in the Joyful Marriage Project, an initiative that invites and equips couples to make their marriage more joyful. In this Sunday’s second reading, St Paul exhorts us to “consider [our] own calling” (1 Cor. 1:26). What does one have to do with the other?

For us married couples, considering our own “calling” is a reminder to constantly be aware of the mission of our life. Not that we forget we are married, but we sometimes forget how much we love our spouse. When we take for granted the passionate love we have for our spouse, joy leaks out of our relationship.

Just as Christ was always mindful of His mission to bring God’s love to humanity, we married couples must be focused on bringing God’s love to our spouse.

For practical tips on how to “consider your own calling,” go to www.joyfulmarriageproject.com.

The foregoing is this week’s installment of the “Marriage Minute,” produced by the Marriage and Family Life Office of the Archdiocese, which attempts to view the Sunday readings through the lens of the Sacrament of Marriage.